CARING FOR CAREGIVERS

Caregiving is providing daily, hands-on, live-in care for a family member or being responsible for the emotional, financial and/or physical care and well-being of another. 

This includes caring for a grandfather with Alzheimer’s disease, caring for a child with a spinal cord injury following a diving accident, caring for a wife with Parkinson’s disease, caring for a friend with AIDS, or caring for a mother with cancer. 

This includes caring for a grandfather with Alzheimer’s disease, caring for a child with a spinal cord injury following a diving accident, caring for a wife with Parkinson’s disease, caring for a friend with AIDS, or caring for a mother with cancer. Caregiving can be part-time or full-time. It can require one to live with the person being cared for or live separately.

The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that 30% of the workforce is balancing their personal and work responsibilities as they care for someone. By 2010, the caregiver work-force was expected to jump to 54%.

We want to help you, as a caregiver, find support as you deal with such normal emotions as resentment, guilt, anger, fear, frustration, fatigue, loneliness and the like.

FINDING SUPPORT: Don’t fly solo as you navigate the very real emotions which naturally come when one becomes a caregiver for another person in need. Connect with a Caregivers support group that can provide you with emotional guidance. It’s a place where you’ll find caring people who understand the issues you face.

THE FOUNDATION FOR HEALING: If you are a caregiver and are like many caregivers, you may not be aware that you likely need emotional support of some kind. It is not easy to admit this “need” yet when one does it becomes the foundation for spiritual, social, emotional and even physical health.

PERSONAL STUDY: The curriculum that will be covered will provide scriptural readings and interactive exercises to help you dig deeper as you cope with your personal circumstances.